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Jimmy Johnson: Draft Master?


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#1 D'Love

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:13 AM

Jimmy Johnson became the Head Football Coach of the Dallas Cowboys at the moment that Jerry Jones bought the team. He spent five years as head coach and is credited by most fans and media as the mastermind behind the three Superbowls the team won in the nineties, even though one of them came two full seasons after his departure. His firing/resignation was a seemingly mutual agreement between he and Jerry Jones as they both seemed to have enough of each other’s glory getting in the way of their own. He went on to be the Head Coach of the Miami Dolphins for four years, albeit with far less success.

Jimmy is given more of the credit for the building of the Cowboys Team of the Nineties and thought by many to be one of the best football talent evaluators of the league’s history. In an attempt to balance those opinions, I have gathered some key points into this segment.
During his years with the Cowboys, the team drafted 63 players, including 2 first-overall picks, 5 other first-rounders, 8 second-rounders, and 9 third-rounders. Three of those 63 players 3 became All-Pro with the Cowboys. Thirteen of those players played in 53 Pro Bowls, which sounds great. However, only 9 of them played in 32 Pro Bowls FOR THE COWBOYS. But let’s drill down into some of those Pro Bowlers a little more, shall we?

First, you have Troy Aikman: first-overall selection of 1989, 6-time Pro Bowler, Super Bowl XXVII MVP, first-ballet Hall of Famer. Impressive, yeah? But wait. Troy was taken with the first-overall selection and the team desperately needed a QB. In the 1989 draft, only one QB was selected in the first round, and that WAS Troy, the highest rated player on everyone’s board. This pick was a no-brainer, a gimme. Are we really going to stamp “Genius” on the guy for this? But wait. Jimmy wasn’t really sold on Troy as the key to bringing the Cowboys back to glory. In fact, he convinced Jerry Jones to spend their 1990 first-rounder in the 1989 supplemental draft on HIS guy, Miami Hurricane QB, Steve Walsh. The 1989 Cowboys, went 1-15 and were awarded the first-overall selection. But that selection had already been spent on Walsh, costing the Cowboys a chance at drafting the highest-rated player that year, too, Junior Seau.

A second-round selection from 1989, Daryl “Moose” Johnston, also went to the Pro Bowl, twice. In fact, Moose is credited by the league as the player responsible for including a true fullback position in the Pro Bowl voting. But wait! The 39th pick used to select Moose wasn’t originally a Cowboys’ pick. They traded to get it. What did they trade, exactly? Well, they weren’t able to make a trade out of the 29th pick before making it, so they selected OG Steve Wisniewski and then traded him along with selection #140 to the Raiders for picks number 39, 68, and 119. Moose became a fan-favorite and no disrespect to him. However, neither Rhondy Weston (68) nor Willis Crockett (119) was on an NFL roster for longer than a single full season. And as great as Moose was with his 2 Pro Bowl spots while playing 151 games over 11 seasons, Wisniewski became a 2-time All-Pro, 8-time Pro Bowler while playing 206 games in 13 seasons. Nice trade.

Emmitt Smith: first-round pick in 1990 (from the Herschel Walker trade), 4-time All-Pro, 8-time Pro Bowler, 4-time Rushing Leader, Super bowl XXVIII MVP, 1993 NFL MVP, NFL’s All-Time Leading Rusher, first-ballot Hall of Famer. That is a mouthful, right there. But wait! Do we give Jimmy credit for this pick, too? There are accounts all over the record showing that Jimmy was trying to trade up from where they were selecting into a high enough spot to take LB James Francis (Since they didnt have the top pick to use on Seau). After several attempts failed and the Bengals drafted Francis, Jimmy is reported to try to trade up to pick LB Lamar Lathon, succeeding in a trade with the Steelers up to #17. Lathon, however, was selected by the Oilers at #15. Stuck at 17, Jimmy “settled” for the small, slow runningback from Florida. Pure Genius.

In 1991, the Cowboys made three first-round picks. DT Russell Maryland went to a single Pro Bowl in his career, despite also being a first-overall selection in the Jimmy Johnson era. WR Alvin Harper was taken 12th and missed the Pro Bowl, though became a fan favorite and a complement to Irvin. DT Kelvin Pritchett not only missed the Pro Bowl, he never even made the Cowboys team, playing his 208-game career in Detroit and Jacksonville. Meanwhile, WR Herman Moore was taken 10th by the Lions and went on to be a 3-time All-Pro, 4-time Pro Bowler. He probably would have complemented Irvin even better had he been selected instead of Maryland. And, NT Ted Washington, 1 All-Pro, 4 Pro Bowls, could have been taken with either of the later picks, since he was available for the 49ers to draft at 25.So Maryland, Harper and Pritchett or Moore and Washington?

Many people forget that Jimmy Smith was drafted by the Cowboys. He played 7 games in 1992 before he broke his leg. Then had an emergency appendectomy leading to an infection, missing the entire 1993 season, and was ultimately released. The Eagles had him for 1994 Training Camp, but released him, also. He went on to a 5-time Pro Bowl career with the Jaguars.
Ron Stone and Brock Marion were drafted in 1993 and each went to the Pro Bowl three times. But neither of them went as a Cowboy. In fact, Stone went nine years after leaving the Cowboys and Marion went while with Miami, after Jimmy Johnson retired from his Head Coaching stint there.
That leaves us with Pro Bowlers Mark Stepnoski (5, 3 with Dallas), Tony Tolbert (1), Erik Williams (4), Leon Lett (2), and Darren Woodson (5) that can truly be attributed to Jimmy Johnson’s ability to evaluate talent for the draft. That’s less than an 8% success rate.

Finally, of Jimmy’s 63 draft picks, only 62% of them (39) played in the league for more than two years and 21% never played in the league, at all. Only 33% (21) played for the Cowboys more than two years. In fact, 23 players (37%) drafted in the Johnson era NEVER EVEN PLAYED FOR THE COWBOYS!!! So, two-thirds of Jimmy’s picks were Cowboys for two years or less and for some reason the drafting was so much better back then than it is now? Am I missing something?
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#2 kskboys

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:39 AM

IMO, Jimmy was more of a great team builder than he was a draft guru.

However, you can't use strictly probowlers as the measure.

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#3 diehardblues

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:39 AM

Jimmy Johnson became the Head Football Coach of the Dallas Cowboys at the moment that Jerry Jones bought the team. He spent five years as head coach and is credited by most fans and media as the mastermind behind the three Superbowls the team won in the nineties, even though one of them came two full seasons after his departure. His firing/resignation was a seemingly mutual agreement between he and Jerry Jones as they both seemed to have enough of each other’s glory getting in the way of their own. He went on to be the Head Coach of the Miami Dolphins for four years, albeit with far less success.

Jimmy is given more of the credit for the building of the Cowboys Team of the Nineties and thought by many to be one of the best football talent evaluators of the league’s history. In an attempt to balance those opinions, I have gathered some key points into this segment.
During his years with the Cowboys, the team drafted 63 players, including 2 first-overall picks, 5 other first-rounders, 8 second-rounders, and 9 third-rounders. Three of those 63 players 3 became All-Pro with the Cowboys. Thirteen of those players played in 53 Pro Bowls, which sounds great. However, only 9 of them played in 32 Pro Bowls FOR THE COWBOYS. But let’s drill down into some of those Pro Bowlers a little more, shall we?

First, you have Troy Aikman: first-overall selection of 1989, 6-time Pro Bowler, Super Bowl XXVII MVP, first-ballet Hall of Famer. Impressive, yeah? But wait. Troy was taken with the first-overall selection and the team desperately needed a QB. In the 1989 draft, only one QB was selected in the first round, and that WAS Troy, the highest rated player on everyone’s board. This pick was a no-brainer, a gimme. Are we really going to stamp “Genius” on the guy for this? But wait. Jimmy wasn’t really sold on Troy as the key to bringing the Cowboys back to glory. In fact, he convinced Jerry Jones to spend their 1990 first-rounder in the 1989 supplemental draft on HIS guy, Miami Hurricane QB, Steve Walsh. The 1989 Cowboys, went 1-15 and were awarded the first-overall selection. But that selection had already been spent on Walsh, costing the Cowboys a chance at drafting the highest-rated player that year, too, Junior Seau.

A second-round selection from 1989, Daryl “Moose” Johnston, also went to the Pro Bowl, twice. In fact, Moose is credited by the league as the player responsible for including a true fullback position in the Pro Bowl voting. But wait! The 39th pick used to select Moose wasn’t originally a Cowboys’ pick. They traded to get it. What did they trade, exactly? Well, they weren’t able to make a trade out of the 29th pick before making it, so they selected OG Steve Wisniewski and then traded him along with selection #140 to the Raiders for picks number 39, 68, and 119. Moose became a fan-favorite and no disrespect to him. However, neither Rhondy Weston (68) nor Willis Crockett (119) was on an NFL roster for longer than a single full season. And as great as Moose was with his 2 Pro Bowl spots while playing 151 games over 11 seasons, Wisniewski became a 2-time All-Pro, 8-time Pro Bowler while playing 206 games in 13 seasons. Nice trade.

Emmitt Smith: first-round pick in 1990 (from the Herschel Walker trade), 4-time All-Pro, 8-time Pro Bowler, 4-time Rushing Leader, Super bowl XXVIII MVP, 1993 NFL MVP, NFL’s All-Time Leading Rusher, first-ballot Hall of Famer. That is a mouthful, right there. But wait! Do we give Jimmy credit for this pick, too? There are accounts all over the record showing that Jimmy was trying to trade up from where they were selecting into a high enough spot to take LB James Francis (Since they didnt have the top pick to use on Seau). After several attempts failed and the Bengals drafted Francis, Jimmy is reported to try to trade up to pick LB Lamar Lathon, succeeding in a trade with the Steelers up to #17. Lathon, however, was selected by the Oilers at #15. Stuck at 17, Jimmy “settled” for the small, slow runningback from Florida. Pure Genius.

In 1991, the Cowboys made three first-round picks. DT Russell Maryland went to a single Pro Bowl in his career, despite also being a first-overall selection in the Jimmy Johnson era. WR Alvin Harper was taken 12th and missed the Pro Bowl, though became a fan favorite and a complement to Irvin. DT Kelvin Pritchett not only missed the Pro Bowl, he never even made the Cowboys team, playing his 208-game career in Detroit and Jacksonville. Meanwhile, WR Herman Moore was taken 10th by the Lions and went on to be a 3-time All-Pro, 4-time Pro Bowler. He probably would have complemented Irvin even better had he been selected instead of Maryland. And, NT Ted Washington, 1 All-Pro, 4 Pro Bowls, could have been taken with either of the later picks, since he was available for the 49ers to draft at 25.So Maryland, Harper and Pritchett or Moore and Washington?

Many people forget that Jimmy Smith was drafted by the Cowboys. He played 7 games in 1992 before he broke his leg. Then had an emergency appendectomy leading to an infection, missing the entire 1993 season, and was ultimately released. The Eagles had him for 1994 Training Camp, but released him, also. He went on to a 5-time Pro Bowl career with the Jaguars.
Ron Stone and Brock Marion were drafted in 1993 and each went to the Pro Bowl three times. But neither of them went as a Cowboy. In fact, Stone went nine years after leaving the Cowboys and Marion went while with Miami, after Jimmy Johnson retired from his Head Coaching stint there.
That leaves us with Pro Bowlers Mark Stepnoski (5, 3 with Dallas), Tony Tolbert (1), Erik Williams (4), Leon Lett (2), and Darren Woodson (5) that can truly be attributed to Jimmy Johnson’s ability to evaluate talent for the draft. That’s less than an 8% success rate.

Finally, of Jimmy’s 63 draft picks, only 62% of them (39) played in the league for more than two years and 21% never played in the league, at all. Only 33% (21) played for the Cowboys more than two years. In fact, 23 players (37%) drafted in the Johnson era NEVER EVEN PLAYED FOR THE COWBOYS!!! So, two-thirds of Jimmy’s picks were Cowboys for two years or less and for some reason the drafting was so much better back then than it is now? Am I missing something?

Very interesting. I researched Jerry's drafts compared to Landrys in an attempt ot call out Jerry and found that a little over 50% of all draft picks actually become starters. Jerry has performed about as well as Landry and the rest of the NFL.The best in this era is the Pats with about 57% so no doubt drafting is about a 50-50 roll of the dice. In the end I found it is more about how well the top 50% work out.

In other words if the Aikmans & Emmitts don't become as great as they were we don't have the success we did and what has happenned in this era. Up front many of our picks look solid but if they don't meet their potential which builds a team chemistry and a winning attitude it can all be for naught.

I really think Jerry has tried to follow what he did early on but Romo is not Troy, Dez is not Michael, Murray is not Emmitt, etc and there inlies the difference. That seperation of talent evaluation whether it works out or not is the difference and often it is about the Big Misses I have often referred to also. If Troy, Michale & Emmitt had been misses then we might have looked in the 90's like we do today. Plus some credit has to be given to the coach for not only assembling a great coaching staff who believes in what he is doing which can help maximise his efforts but also for making the most out of the talent he has but I do see your point . Excellent research!

   

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#4 diehardblues

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:40 AM

IMO, Jimmy was more of a great team builder than he was a draft guru.

That too,LOL...and what in too much length I was trying to say also.
Thanks KS!!

   

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#5 Quickdraw

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:46 AM

Jimmy also had the backing of an almost unlimited bank account in Jerry. Back then trades could be made and players signed without the worry of the salary cap. Also, you could keep guys longer because there was no free agency.

With parody came mediocrity. You'll never see anything like what Jimmy and Jerry were able to accomplish.

#6 kskboys

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:58 AM

Very interesting. I researched Jerry's drafts compared to Landrys in an attempt ot call out Jerry and found that a little over 50% of all draft picks actually become starters. Jerry has performed about as well as Landry and the rest of the NFL.The best in this era is the Pats with about 57% so no doubt drafting is about a 50-50 roll of the dice. In the end I found it is more about how well the top 50% work out.

In other words if the Aikmans & Emmitts don't become as great as they were we don't have the success we did and what has happenned in this era. Up front many of our picks look solid but if they don't meet their potential which builds a team chemistry and a winning attitude it can all be for naught.

I really think Jerry has tried to follow what he did early on but Romo is not Troy, Dez is not Michael, Murray is not Emmitt, etc and there inlies the difference. That seperation of talent evaluation whether it works out or not is the difference and often it is about the Big Misses I have often referred to also. If Troy, Michale & Emmitt had been misses then we might have looked in the 90's like we do today. Plus some credit has to be given to the coach for not only assembling a great coaching staff who believes in what he is doing which can help maximise his efforts but also for making the most out of the talent he has but I do see your point . Excellent research!

I disagree, but just a little bit. The true gems were the O and Dliners we drafted who were instrumental in our super bowl wins. I do not think that JJ has tried to do what he did to win 3 super bowls. Go back and look how many trench people we took in the 1st 4 rounds.

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#7 crouchinmonkeyhiddenmonkey

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:41 AM

Great stuff D'Love. Jimmy was an awesome coach.


But people tend to overrate his G.M. skills.

9RUgY.gif"But if I were still coaching today, I'd want Tony Romo to be my quarterback. I know everybody is down on him right now, but I AM 100% SURE HE CAN BE A BIG WINNER IN THIS LEAGUE. " "Absolutely no doubt in my mind you can win what you want to win with Tony. He'd be my quarterback."


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#8 D'Love

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:15 PM

IMO, Jimmy was more of a great team builder than he was a draft guru.

However, you can't use strictly probowlers as the measure.

I agree, ksk. The whole point of the piece was to neutralize those that selectively remember the great players that were around then and attribute them all to Jimmy and they see so many fewer players since and think it's because Jerry isn't getting it done. The last paragraph that explains how many of Jimmy-era drafted players never playing in the league, or didn't play for the Cowboys, etc. shows that it's more than just Pro-Bowlers. I think another point I wanted to make is that it wasn't smoother then than it is today. They (Jerry AND Jimmy) made just as many bad personnel moves as Jerry has with any of his other coaches. They were just hidden by the lack of salary cap, that today restricts them from making moves to cover up other moves.
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#9 D'Love

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:21 PM

Plus some credit has to be given to the coach for not only assembling a great coaching staff who believes in what he is doing which can help maximise his efforts but also for making the most out of the talent he has but I do see your point . Excellent research!

Thank you. This particular piece was simply about the "draft genius" status that many current fans want to label Jimmy with, so it's only focused on the draft aspect of his contribution. I don't think anything less of him as a draft evaluator, coach, cheerleader, ball-breaker, etc., than he deserves, considering he's HELPED build a team that won three Superbowls in 4 seasons.
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#10 D'Love

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:30 PM

I disagree, but just a little bit. The true gems were the O and Dliners we drafted who were instrumental in our super bowl wins. I do not think that JJ has tried to do what he did to win 3 super bowls. Go back and look how many trench people we took in the 1st 4 rounds.

I agree, to a degree. But back then with the Walker trade, they had so many picks to burn. Taking so many of those trench guys is one thing as a raw value (I took a quick glance without digging too deep), but with quite a low success rate. These days, when you only have 7 rounds, and you have to make each pick count, and nobody's going to fall for what Minnesota fell for to give you so many extra picks for players that weren't worthy of making a team, you can't burn that many picks in order to gain enough, fast enough. The whole convention since then has changed.
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#11 D'Love

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:33 PM

Thank you all. I was leery of posting something publickly on these forums, thinking it would unleash forces of evil (you know those I'm referring to). I had this exact piece on my personal blog in the old system, but nobody ever came to read it. LOL. I have a few more pieces that I've put together. I may put them up at some point. BTW, this morning, I reached 100 posts and 100 profile views since I re-joined the new system. YAY, I guess. LOL
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#12 oakclifford22

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 01:42 PM

Thank you. This particular piece was simply about the "draft genius" status that many current fans want to label Jimmy with, so it's only focused on the draft aspect of his contribution. I don't think anything less of him as a draft evaluator, coach, cheerleader, ball-breaker, etc., than he deserves, considering he's HELPED build a team that won three Superbowls in 4 seasons.

you forgot to mention (unless I missed it) the fact that Jimmy was a national title winner at the U and knew all the best players in college coming into the Cowboys. I think it's safe to say he had an "unfair" advantage over other coaches already in the league. He coached some of the best and coached against some of the very best players in NFL history in college, so he certainly had a leg up on coaches when it came to personnel, but that was an advantage he lost when he went to the 'phins. He was saddled with an aging Marino and a porus o-line and no rb to speak of, certainly failure was not guaranteed, but being behind that "big" of an 8 ball, it pretty much marked his cards in advance.

#13 D'Love

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:07 PM

He was saddled with an aging Marino and a porus o-line and no rb to speak of, certainly failure was not guaranteed, but being behind that "big" of an 8 ball, it pretty much marked his cards in advance.

Good points. I didn't bring up the advantage you mentioned because it didn't seem to help him. If he had that much of a real advantage and was smart enough to actually use it to his benefit, he'd have had a better than 33% player success rate. At least, I would thin so. As for Miami, I left that out because of the focus I wanted to make on his Cowboys drafting. However, it could be pointed out that while he inherited a Dolphins team without a runningback, they had Karin-Abul-Jabbar,Jerris McPhail, Stanley Pritchett, John Avery, J.J Johnson, Rob Konrad, and Cecil Collins while he was their coach. In all, he had 18 different backs on his teams, yet never had a running game to speak of. The never ranked higher than 19th in yards, or 21st in y/a. Such a great talent evaluator would have gotten at least a decent back in so many attempts, right?
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#14 Big_D

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:08 PM

Jimmy meant so much more than just what he did on draft day. He was a great coach who held his team accountable and got the best out of his players. He built a dominating team in 3 years. By 92 they were on their way to being one of the best teams in history. There's many intangibles that made that happen. He was smart and effective. The draft is only a small part of the process.

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#15 mch0862@yahoo.com

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:17 PM

I think Johnson's record speaks for itself- the Hershell Walker trade will go down as one of the NFL's biggest blockbusters- other teams have gotten deals like this, & it never amounted to a hill of beans..................

#16 mch0862@yahoo.com

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:22 PM

I realize that wasn't the draft, but STILL.........the next years draft was AWESOME....

#17 kskboys

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 02:30 PM

Thank you all. I was leery of posting something publickly on these forums, thinking it would unleash forces of evil (you know those I'm referring to). I had this exact piece on my personal blog in the old system, but nobody ever came to read it. LOL. I have a few more pieces that I've put together. I may put them up at some point. BTW, this morning, I reached 100 posts and 100 profile views since I re-joined the new system. YAY, I guess. LOL

I think you did a great job. Yeah, Jimmy is glorified by most Cowboy fans. I thought he was good, not great.

You also have to consider he caught lightening in a bottle w/ Haley, was going to trade Irvin and didn't, and drafted a LB in the 2nd who turned out to be one of the best S's to ever play the game in Woodson. Did he intend on switching Tuinei to O, or was that yet another lucky stroke? Lotsa things fell in the right place, but since we got 3 super bowls out of it, I tend not to care who gets what credit, I'm just ecstatic that we won!!!

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#18 lordnate

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 03:37 PM

The Cowboys of the 90s were really all about the Herschel Walker trade and the current Cowboys are all about the Roy Williams trade.

Every team at least drafts some good players. When you have as many picks as we had from the Herschel Walker trade, you get a lot of chances to find great players. We did good things outside of that trade, but like I said, every team does. Look at the Lions of the 90s. Barry Sanders and Herman Moore? Can't say I wouldn't like to have those kind of players on my team. Still, they didn't have a complete team, and that's why they were unsuccessful.

Most of our recent drafts have netted some good players. The big hole in our drafting was the 2009 draft, where we traded our 1st, 3rd, and 6th round picks to the Lions for Roy Williams. That completely change our draft philosophy. Since we didn't have the ammo to go get good players, we decided to use our remaining picks on special teams players. That didn't work out so well.

If we had our 1st round pick back from 2009, we would have had the 20th pick in the first round. We could have drafted Alex Mack, who the Browns selected with the 22nd overall pick. Alex Mack is the Browns center and he's been to the pro bowl. If we still wanted a WR, we could have taken Hakeem Nicks or Percy Harvin. Harvin might not seem like much value now that he's been struggling with injuries, but injuries can be a wrong place at the wrong time thing. If we took a WR in the 2009 draft, that would free us up to take Devin McCourty in 2010. McCourty has made the Pro Bowl playing CB, which means last year our secondary wouldn't have been such a disaster. It also would have meant we wouldn't have needed to sign Brandon Carr this year, which sets us up to sign Carl Nicks. And this is all just if we had that 2009 1st round pick. With the other picks we gave up, we might have gotten something too.

#19 Big_D

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 04:01 PM

The Cowboys of the 90s were really all about the Herschel Walker trade and the current Cowboys are all about the Roy Williams trade.

Every team at least drafts some good players. When you have as many picks as we had from the Herschel Walker trade, you get a lot of chances to find great players. We did good things outside of that trade, but like I said, every team does. Look at the Lions of the 90s. Barry Sanders and Herman Moore? Can't say I wouldn't like to have those kind of players on my team. Still, they didn't have a complete team, and that's why they were unsuccessful.

Most of our recent drafts have netted some good players. The big hole in our drafting was the 2009 draft, where we traded our 1st, 3rd, and 6th round picks to the Lions for Roy Williams. That completely change our draft philosophy. Since we didn't have the ammo to go get good players, we decided to use our remaining picks on special teams players. That didn't work out so well.

If we had our 1st round pick back from 2009, we would have had the 20th pick in the first round. We could have drafted Alex Mack, who the Browns selected with the 22nd overall pick. Alex Mack is the Browns center and he's been to the pro bowl. If we still wanted a WR, we could have taken Hakeem Nicks or Percy Harvin. Harvin might not seem like much value now that he's been struggling with injuries, but injuries can be a wrong place at the wrong time thing. If we took a WR in the 2009 draft, that would free us up to take Devin McCourty in 2010. McCourty has made the Pro Bowl playing CB, which means last year our secondary wouldn't have been such a disaster. It also would have meant we wouldn't have needed to sign Brandon Carr this year, which sets us up to sign Carl Nicks. And this is all just if we had that 2009 1st round pick. With the other picks we gave up, we might have gotten something too.


Even without a first round pick, you have to come away with something when you have 12 picks. Has anyone ever heard of a special teams draft until 2009? That was actually as bad as it gets in the war room. The Roy Williams trade, the galloway trade... there are a number of moves that should've never happened cause this team would be in much better shape over the past decade without those decisions.

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#20 lordnate

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 04:58 PM

Even without a first round pick, you have to come away with something when you have 12 picks. Has anyone ever heard of a special teams draft until 2009? That was actually as bad as it gets in the war room. The Roy Williams trade, the galloway trade... there are a number of moves that should've never happened cause this team would be in much better shape over the past decade without those decisions.


I agree that you should get something with 12 draft picks. I just think, not having a 1st round pick made our team change focus. We had a 2nd round pick, but traded back for more picks. We traded back several other times which is why we ended up with so many draft picks. We were passing on players that had starting potential to get players with special teams potential. It was stupid regardless of our situation. I'll agree with that.

As far as the Galloway trade, I agree that it really hurt us, but I think it had a bigger impact on how well the team was under Parcells. Those players we would have drafted then, by now would be on the down side of their careers at best. Still, we might have actually been able to do something special under Parcells had we not wrecked the team before he had a chance to fix it.